Imagine an anxious upset dog running around chasing its tail.

First, you may copy the dog, just to try to understand the dog better. Literally, what does it feels like to be running around chasing a tail!

When you’ve understood the body language, you’ll be better able to identify what’s going on for the dog (or your child).

You may then sit quietly with the dog, whilst it continues to chase its tail.

By this time, it’ll be easier to see past the whirlwind and understand the angst instead.

You’ll realize that telling the dog not to chase its tail doesn’t help.

The dog will eventually stop.

It will see you’ve accepted it just as it is, and you’ve remained calm.

It may observe you incredulously… “wow you stayed with my chaos when I couldn’t quit!”

Now that it’s run out of energy, it may emulate your calm.

It may still be anxious and skittish of course.

It may jump if you move to stroke it. You’ll only touch it as much as it’ll allow.

As you remain calm, the dog will become calm, and fall asleep in the safety of your presence.

Later, the dog will wake.

You’ll be there. Maybe drawing or doing something quiet.

The dog will still feel safe.

It may just chill

Or it may get up and chase its tail again.

The tail chasing will diminish as this environment continues, as trust and connection build.

As the dog improves, it’ll be fun and boisterous. It’ll always be a sensitive dog. But it won’t live in the tornado of endless tail-chasing.

Love is the beginning and end of everything

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU


Skye Baloo Carnegie, ADHD, Autism, HSP, ADHD Parents, ADHD Grandparents

Download WHAT EVERY CHILDWISHES YOU KNEW ABOUT ADHDe-Book

A rare perspective and honest account of what it's like to have ADHD told through their own words.

Grab Now

Imagine an anxious upset dog running around chasing its tail.

First, you may copy the dog, just to try to understand the dog better. Literally, what does it feels like to be running around chasing a tail!

When you’ve understood the body language, you’ll be better able to identify what’s going on for the dog (or your child).

You may then sit quietly with the dog, whilst it continues to chase its tail.

By this time, it’ll be easier to see past the whirlwind and understand the angst instead.

You’ll realize that telling the dog not to chase its tail doesn’t help.

The dog will eventually stop.

It will see you’ve accepted it just as it is, and you’ve remained calm.

It may observe you incredulously… “wow you stayed with my chaos when I couldn’t quit!”

Now that it’s run out of energy, it may emulate your calm.

It may still be anxious and skittish of course.

It may jump if you move to stroke it. You’ll only touch it as much as it’ll allow.

As you remain calm, the dog will become calm, and fall asleep in the safety of your presence.

Later, the dog will wake.

You’ll be there. Maybe drawing or doing something quiet.

The dog will still feel safe.

It may just chill

Or it may get up and chase its tail again.

The tail chasing will diminish as this environment continues, as trust and connection build.

As the dog improves, it’ll be fun and boisterous. It’ll always be a sensitive dog. But it won’t live in the tornado of endless tail-chasing.

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU


Skye Baloo Carnegie, ADHD, Autism, HSP, ADHD Parents, ADHD Grandparents

Download WHAT EVERY CHILD WISHES YOU KNEW ABOUT ADHD e-Book

A rare perspective and honest account of what it's like to have ADHD told through their own words.

Grab Now

Love is the beginning and end of everything

ADHDRedefined